To die is certain

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I know I’m doomed to die;
Maybe today, end of the day
Or some other day if not today;
Somehow, I’m doomed to die.

I don’t want to fight for fame,
For fame does not long remain;
whether it’s fame or shame;
I’m certain, it’s doomed to die.

I don’t want to live in a dream,
For I know I’m doomed to wake,
Nor I want to dry your dreams;
For I know, they’re doomed to die.

Don’t think that I’d love to die,
Or I would dash inside and hide,
For when he knocks our own doors;
I know, we all are doomed to go.

 

Copyright © August 19, 2018, Newton Ranaweera
Image source: Pixabay
Inspiration from William Shakespeare’s “Song: Fear no more the heat of the sun”

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64 thoughts on “To die is certain

  1. We all have to die, but its what happens after you die. Where do you spend eternity in heaven or hell? You see God so loved the world that He sent ONLY begotten Son Jesus Christ to die for us so that you and I can be saved and obtain eternal life through Him. He’s the ONLY way to His Father which is God and also to heaven. We can’t enter in if we are not born again. We can’t have eternal life if we don’t accept Him as our Lord and Savior. So, will you accept Him today?
    He loves you very much. I love you with His eternal love in me. If I didn’t I wouldn’t have told you this.
    Jesus is coming again, repent and accept Jesus. Blessings! ❤

    Liked by 5 people

  2. I just comment on what I see, Newton. In fact, it occured to me that when I write a short comment or a review of a poem or of an entire book I am just doing the same as a shoe polisher: Make the good things stand out and shine, make them more obvious and explicit to the author and to the others. I cannot imagine another way. This is constructive and not destructive as some reviewers do. I recommend you this brilliant article: https://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/how-to-be-a-critic

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Thank you again for this great explanation and the link. In the light of what you explained, I think we can interpret Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea as a result of criticism he had had for his previous piece. 🙂

    Like

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